Higher Education

Philosophy of Science Complete: A Text on Traditional Problems and Schools of Thought, 2nd Edition

  • Edwin Hung University of Waikato, New Zealand
  • ISBN-10: 1133943039  |  ISBN-13: 9781133943037
  • 512 Pages
  • Previous Editions: 1997
  • © 2014 | Published
  • College Bookstore Wholesale Price = $148.25
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About

Overview

One of the most comprehensive and yet accessible texts on the market, PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE COMPLETE: A TEXT ON TRADITIONAL PROBLEMS AND SCHOOLS OF THOUGHT, Second Edition is updated to include current developments in this complex field of study. This volume consists of two parts: Book I deals with traditional problems in the philosophy of science: logic, explanation, and epistemology. Book II presents various schools and systems of thought from the philosophy of science. Prominently featured are: rationalism, empiricism, logical positivism and constructivism. The text offers both breadth and depth, but is written in clear and straightforward language, making it appropriate for philosophy of science courses at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.

Features and Benefits

  • Encyclopedic in scope and detailed in substance, covering all of the major issues in the philosophy of science and explaining them in detail through many examples.
  • Clarity of explanation and liberal use of examples makes it possible for students from all academic backgrounds to gain a thorough understanding of the issues.
  • This text is progressive, gaining complexity with each chapter.
  • Pedagogical devices include chapter introductions and summaries, examples, case studies, illustrations, exercises and lists of terms to assist students in review.
  • A bibliography and index at the end of the text aid student research.

Table of Contents

Preface.
A Word to Instructors.
A Word to Students.
INTRODUCTION: WHAT IS THE PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE?
A Tale of Two Theories: The Story of Light.
BOOK I. TRADITIONAL PROBLEMS: TRUTH, EXPLANATION, AND REALITY.
PART I. BASIC TYPES OF REASONING IN SCIENCE.
1. Hypotheses.
2. Deductive Reasoning.
3. Inductive Reasoning.
4. Statistical and Probalistic Reasoning.
PART II. THE SEARCH FOR TRUTH.
5. Empirical Discovery of Plausible Hypotheses.
6. Empirical Evaluation I: Indirect Tests and Auxiliary Hypotheses.
7. Empirical Evaluation II: Crucial Tests and AD HOC Revisions.
8. Theoretical Justification: Theories and Their Uses.
9. Conventionalism and the Duhem-Quine Thesis.
PART III. THE QUEST FOR EXPLANATION.
10. Covering-Law Thesis of Explanation.
11. Universal Laws of Nature.
12. Probalistic Explanation and Probalistic Causality.
13. Teleological Explanation, Mind, and Reductionism.
14. Other Theories of Explanation: the Contextual, the Casual, and the Unificatory.
PART IV. THE PURSUIT OF REALITY.
15. The Classical View of Scientific Theories.
16. Realism Versus Instrumentalism.
17. Critiques of the Classical View.
18. Antirealism I: The Empiricist Challenge.
Intermezzo: So, How Does Science Work?
BOOK II. SCHOOLS OF THOUGHT: RATIONALISM, EMPIRICISM, POSITIVISM, AND CONSTRUCTIVISM
PART V. RATIONALISM AND EMPIRICISM.
19. Rationalism and Then Empiricism.
20. Problems of Empiricism IA: Hume's Problem.
21. Problems of Empiricism IB: Goodman's Paradox and Hempel's Paradox.
22. Problems of Empiricism II: Problem of Observation.
PART VI. THE CLASSICAL DYNASTY.
23. Logical Positivism.
24. Popper's Falsificationism.
PART VII. THE WELTANSCHAUUNG REVOLUTION.
25. Introduction: Two Paradigm Theories.
26. Kuhn I: Normal Science and Revolutionary Science.
27. Kuhn II: Incommensurability and Relativism.
PART VIII. TOWARDS HISTORY, SOCIOLOGY, AND ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE.
28. Lakatos: The Revisionist Popperian.
29. Laudan: The Eclectic Historicist.
30. History, Sociology, and Philosophy of Science.
31. Antirealism II: The Constructivist Rebellion.
32. Artificial Intelligience and the Philosophy of Science.
Epilogue.
Bibliography.
Index.

What's New

  • The author has updated the information throughout the text to reflect changes in the Philosophy of Science field.
  • The references and exercises, which were previously found at the end of each Part, have been moved to the end of the chapters.
  • Together in one volume, Book 1: Truth, Explanation, and Reality deals with traditional problems in philosophy of science comprising what could be considered a micro-philosophy of science. Book 2: Rationalism, Empiricism, Positivism, and Constructivism presents various schools and systems of thought, and could be called a macro-philosophy of science. In this edition, these can be made available separately through our custom publishing program. Contact your Cengage Learning representative for more information.
  • The new edition has been retitled to better reflect the content and scope of the text.

Efficacy and Outcomes

Reviews

"Very clear and nicely brisk."

— Leslie Burkholder, University of British Columbia

"A perfect fit for today's lower-division undergraduates."

— Michael Smith, College of the Desert

"The author strikes a near-perfect balance between the background issues in philosophy of science drawn from empirically-driven scientific discoveries, and the more purely philosophical issues."

— Michael Smith, College of the Desert

"The book offers a remarkably comprehensive treatment of most key topics in philosophy of science."

— Michael Smith, College of the Desert

"Well written, Comprehensive in scope."

— William Jones, Old Dominion University

"Extensive and brisk coverage of many topics in philosophy of science."

— Leslie Burkholder, University of British Columbia

Meet the Author

Author Bio

Edwin Hung

Edwin Hung is a recently retired Reader of Philosophy at the University of Waikato, New Zealand. He studied philosophy at Oxford University, where he obtained his doctoral degree (D.Phil.). He has been an honorary fellow of Linacre College (Oxford), a research associate at the Boston University Center of Philosophy and History of Science, and a visiting scholar at Harvard University, MIT, and the Minnesota Center for the Philosophy of Science. He has written three books and is also published widely in the fields of philosophy of science, philosophy of mathematics, philosophy of logic and philosophy of language.