Higher Education

Sources of World History, Volume II, 5th Edition

  • Mark A. Kishlansky Harvard University
  • ISBN-10: 0495913189  |  ISBN-13: 9780495913184
  • 432 Pages
  • Previous Editions: 2007, 1999
  • © 2012 | Published
  • College Bookstore Wholesale Price = $119.25
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About

Overview

Edited by Mark Kishlansky, this reader is designed to supplement world history courses with a rich array of primary source materials, including constitutional documents, political theory, philosophy, imaginative literature, and social description. Opting for longer selections that allow students to gain a deeper sense of authors and their texts, the editor has chosen each selection because of its ability to raise a significant issue around which classroom discussions or lectures can evolve. This reader contains works that are representative of major civilization complexes (Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Islamic world, and Western civilization).

Features and Benefits

  • Five new documents, including non-Western sources, have been added to Volume II to enhance its breadth and diversity. New readings include Japanese Factory Girls’ Laments, material from Olympe de Gouges’ BLACK SLAVERY and Aphra Behn’s OROONOKO, and Emperor Hirohito’s Surrender Rescript.
  • Alternative Tables of Contents for this reader are organized regionally and chronologically, making it easier for you to find the documents that are relevant to your courses and incorporate them into your syllabus.
  • Introductory sections on “How to Read a Visual” and “How to Read a Document” introduce students to a disciplined approach to working with primary sources, encouraging them to use their critical faculties and imagination in studying history.
  • Expanded photo captions encourage students to interpret each illustration in light of the document or era in which it appears.
  • Coverage of non-Western societies includes material on South Asia and a set of documents on Japan and the coming of westernization, as well as sections on cultural encounters that encourage comparative perspectives.

Table of Contents

Preface.
Contents by Regions.
Chronological Contents.
How to Read a Document.
How to Read a Visual.
Part IV. THE WORLD OF TRAVELERS AND TRADERS.
17. Monarchy and Revolution.
89. James I, True Law of a Free Monarchy (1598). 90. Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan (1651). 91. Philippe Duplessis-Mornay, A Defense of Liberty Against Tyrants (1579). 92. Duc de Saint-Simon, Memoirs (1694-1723).
18. The New Science.
93. Galileo Galilei, The Two New Sciences (1638). 94. René Descartes, Discourse on Method (1637).
19. Empires of Goods.
95. Anonymous, The Rise and Decline of Flora (ca. 1637). 96. Thomas Mun, England’’s Treasure by Foreign Trade (1664). 97. Adam Smith, The Wealth of Nations (1776).
20. Asia Alone.
98. Yamamoto Tsunetomo, Hagakure (The Book of the Samurai) (1716). 99. Honda Toshiaki, A Secret Plan for Managing the Country (1798). 100. Ferdinand Verbiest, Letter from China (1683). 101. K’’ang-hsi, A Eulogy for the Emperor (1722). 102. Wu Ching-Tzu, The Scholars (1750).
21. The European Enlightenment.
103. Jean-Jacques Rousseau, The Social Contract (1762). 104. Cesare Beccaria, On Crimes and Punishments (1764). 105. Thomas Jefferson, The Declaration of Independence (1776). 106. Montesquieu, Spirit of the Laws (1748). 107. Olympe de Gouges, Introduction to Black Slavery (1792).
22. The French Revolution.
108. Abbé de Sieyes, “What Is the Third Estate?” (1789). 109. The Declaration of the Rights of Man (1789) and The Declaration of the Rights of Woman (1791). 110. Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790).
23. Travelers to the East and West.
111. Aphra Behn, Oroonoko (1688). 112. John Ovington, A Voyage to Surat in the Year 1689 (16). 113. Hsieh Ch’ing Kao, The Hai-Lu (1783-1797). 114. Vasilii Galovnin, Memoirs of a Captivity in Japan (1811-1813). 115. Joseph Crassons de Medeuil, Notes on the French Slave Trade (1784-1785). 116. Vaclav (Remedius) Prutky, Travels in Ethiopia and Other Countries (1751). 117. Olaudah Equiano, The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano (1789). 118. Dean Mahomed, Social Customs of the Muslims (1794). 119. Abul Hassan, Journal at the Court of King George III (1809-1810).
Part V. INDUSTRIALISM AND IMPERIALISM.
24. The Industrial Revolution In Britain.
120. Arthur Young, Political Arithmetic (1774). 121. Samuel Smiles, Self-Help (1859) . 122. Sir Edwin Chadwick, Inquiry into the Condition of the Poor (1842). 123. Friederick Engels, The Condition of the Working Class in England (1845).
25. Critiquing Industrial Society.
124. John Stuart Mill, On Liberty (1859). 125. Pierre Proudhon, What Is Property? (1840). 126. Karl Marx and Friederick Engels, The Communist Manifesto (1848). 127. Charles Darwin, The Origin of the Species (1859). 128. Sigmund Freud, The Interpretation of Dreams (1899). 129. Japanese Factory Girls’ Laments (ca. 1870s-1912).
26. Controlling Latin America.
130. Simon Bolivar, Jamacian Letter (1815). 131. James Monroe, The Monroe Doctrine (1823). 132. Two Views of Porfirio Díaz (1910-1912).
27. India under British Rule.
133. Muhabbat Khan, A Description of Calcutta (ca. 1800). 134. Ram Mohun Roy, On the Proposed East India Juries Bill (1833). 135. The Azamgarh Proclamation (1857).
28. Japan’s Opening to the West.
136. Gempaku Sugita, The Anatomy Lesson (1815). 137. Naosuke Ii, Advice about the Policy of Isolation (1853). 138. Norimasa Muragaki, Washington in 1860 (1860). 139. Shibizawa Eiichi, Going into Business (1873). 140. The Meiji Constitution (1889).
29. Imperialism.
141. J. A. Hobson, Imperialism (1902). 142. Rudyard Kipling, The White Man’s Burden (1899). 143. George Orwell, Shooting an Elephant (1936). 144. Sayyid Jamal ad Din al-Afghani, A Commentary on the Commentator (1881). 145. Robert Moffat, Missionary Labors and Scenes in Southern Africa (1846). 146. Carl Veltin, Social Life of the Swahilis (1893-1896).
Part VI THE MODERN WORLD.
30. The First World War.
147. Ernst Jünger, Storm of Steel (1920). 148. Woodrow Wilson, The Fourteen Points (1918). 149. V. I. Lenin, What Is to Be Done? (1902).
31. East Meets West.
150. Lin Tse-Hsü, Letter of Advice to Queen Victoria (1839). 151. Lafcadio Hern, Of Women’s Hair (1894). 152. Fukuzawa Yukichi, On Japanese Women (1885). 153. Sun Yat-Sen, Fundamentals of National Reconstruction (1923).
32. The Soviet Union.
154. Alexandra Kollontai, Theses on Communist Morality in the Sphere of Marital Relations (1921). 155. Alexander Solzhenitsyn, One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich (1962). 156. Winston Churchill, The Iron Curtain (1946). 157. Nikita Khrushchev, Report to the Communist Party Congress (1961).
33. Generations of Cultural Protest.
158. Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own (1929). 159. Jean-Paul Sartre, Existentialism (1946). 160. Simone de Beauvoir, The Second Sex (1949). 161. Bob Dylan, Songs (1962-1965).
34. The Second World War.
162. Adolph Hitler, Mein Kampf (1923). 163. Winston Churchill, Speeches (1940). 164. Emperor Hirohito, Imperial Rescript on Surrender and Imperial Rescript to the Armed Forces (1945). 165. The Charter of the United Nations (1946).
35. India and Independence.
166. Dadabhai Naoroji, The Condition of India (1901). 167. Mohandas Gandhi, Hind Swaraj (1938). 168. Muhammad Ali Jinnah, Two Nations (1940).
36. Struggles of National Liberation.
169. Mao Zedong, On Letting a Hundred Flowers Blossom (1957). 170. Ho Chi Minh, Selected Writings (1945, 1968). 171. Kwame Nkrumah, A Republican Form of Government (1960). 172. Regis Debray, Revolution in the Revolution? (1967). 173. The Arab-Israeli Conflict (1967). 174. Desmond Tutu, My Vision for South Africa (1979). 175. Wole Soyinka, Aké (1981). 176. The Charter of Economic Rights and Duties of States (1974). 177. The Report of the 9/11 Commission (2004).
37. The Japanese Miracle.
178. The Constitution of Japan (1947). 179. Kamei Katsuichiro, An Ideal Portrait of Twentieth-Century Japan (1954). 180. Chitoshi Yanaga, Big Business in Japanese Politics (1968). 181. Donald Richie, Japanese Rhythms (1984). 182. Douglas McGray, Japan’s Gross National Cool (2002).

What's New

  • Selected sets of focus questions for part-opening photos encourage students to analyze what they are looking at and understand the image’s historical significance.

Alternate Formats

Choose the format that best fits your student's budget and course goals

To customize your learning solution, contact your Learning Consultant for more information.

  • Volume I, Paperbound Edition

    ISBN-10: 0495913170 | ISBN-13: 9780495913177

    List Price = $158.95  | CengageBrain Price = $158.95  | College Bookstore Wholesale Price = $119.25

Supplements

All supplements have been updated in coordination with the main title. Select the main title's "About" tab, then select "What's New" for updates specific to title's edition.

For more information about these supplements, or to obtain them, contact your Learning Consultant.

Instructor Supplements

Sources of World History, Volume I  (ISBN-10: 0495913170 | ISBN-13: 9780495913177)

Edited by Mark Kishlansky, this reader is designed to supplement world history courses with a rich array of primary source materials, including constitutional documents, political theory, philosophy, imaginative literature, and social description. Opting for longer selections that allow students to gain a deeper sense of authors and their texts, the editor has chosen each selection because of its ability to raise a significant issue around which classroom discussions or lectures can evolve. This reader contains works that are representative of major civilization complexes (Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Islamic world, and Western civilization).

List Price = $158.95  | CengageBrain Price = $158.95  | College Bookstore Wholesale Price = $119.25

The History Handbook  (ISBN-10: 049590676X | ISBN-13: 9780495906766)

In this new edition of THE HISTORY HANDBOOK, success in a history course is within every student’s reach! Carol Berkin (Baruch College, City University of New York) and Betty Anderson (Boston University) have prepared a no-nonsense guide that teaches basic as well as history-specific study skills--how to read primary sources, research historical topics, correctly cite sources, and more. THE HISTORY HANDBOOK also offers tips for Internet research and evaluating online sources.

List Price = $57.95  | CengageBrain Price = $57.95  | College Bookstore Wholesale Price = $43.50

Writing for College History: A Short Handbook  (ISBN-10: 061830603X | ISBN-13: 9780618306039)

Prepared by Robert M. Frakes, Clarion University. This brief handbook for survey courses in American history, Western Civilization/European history, and world civilization guides students through the various types of writing assignments they encounter in a history class. Providing examples of student writing and candid assessments of student work, this text focuses on the rules and conventions of writing for the college history course.

List Price = $36.95  | CengageBrain Price = $36.95  | College Bookstore Wholesale Price = $27.75

Student Supplements

Sources of World History, Volume I  (ISBN-10: 0495913170 | ISBN-13: 9780495913177)

From constitutional documents, political theory, and philosophy to imaginative literature and social description, you’ll find fascinating primary source material in SOURCES OF WORLD HISTORY VOLUME I. This reader contains works representative of major civilization complexes (Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Islamic world, and Western civilization) and each selection is included for its ability to raise a significant issue.

List Price = $158.95  | CengageBrain Price = $158.95  | College Bookstore Wholesale Price = $119.25

The History Handbook  (ISBN-10: 049590676X | ISBN-13: 9780495906766)

THE HISTORY HANDBOOK, by Carol Berkin (Baruch College, City University of New York) and Betty Anderson (Boston University), is a no-nonsense guide to the skills you need to succeed in a history course. You’ll learn basic as well as history-specific study skills--how to read primary sources, research historical topics, correctly cite sources, and more. THE HISTORY HANDBOOK also offers tips for Internet research and evaluating online sources.

List Price = $57.95  | CengageBrain Price = $57.95  | College Bookstore Wholesale Price = $43.50

Writing for College History: A Short Handbook  (ISBN-10: 061830603X | ISBN-13: 9780618306039)

Prepared by Robert M. Frakes, Clarion University. This brief handbook for survey courses in American history, Western Civilization/European history, and world civilization guides students through the various types of writing assignments they encounter in a history class. Providing examples of student writing and candid assessments of student work, this text focuses on the rules and conventions of writing for the college history course.

List Price = $36.95  | CengageBrain Price = $36.95  | College Bookstore Wholesale Price = $27.75

Meet the Author

Author Bio

Mark A. Kishlansky

Mark Kishlansky is Professor of English and European History and Associate Dean of the Faculty at Harvard University. Before joining the Harvard faculty he taught for sixteen years at the University of Chicago, where he was a member of the Committee on Social Thought. Professor Kishlansky is a specialist on seventeenth-century English political history and has written, among other works, A MONARCHY TRANSFORMED, THE RISE OF THE NEW MODEL ARMY, and PARLIAMENTARY SELECTION: SOCIAL AND POLITICAL CHOICE IN EARLY MODERN ENGLAND. From 1984 to 1991 he was editor of the JOURNAL OF BRITISH STUDIES. He is currently writing a history of the reign of Charles I entitled THE DEATH OF KINGS.