Physical Chemistry, 4th Edition

  • Keith J. Laidler University of Ottawa
  • John H. Meiser Ball State University
  • Bryan C. Sanctuary McGill University
  • ISBN-10: 0618123415
  • ISBN-13: 9780618123414
  • 1088 Pages Hardcover 
  • Previous Editions: 1999, 1995
  • © 2003 | Published
  • College Bookstore Wholesale Price = $252.75 
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About The Solution

Overview

With its clear explanations and practical pedagogy, Physical Chemistry is less intimidating to students than other texts, without sacrificing the mathematical rigor and comprehensiveness necessary for a junior-level physical chemistry course. The text's long-standing reputation for accessible writing provides clear instruction and superior problem-solving support for students.


Table of Contents

Note: Each chaper concludes with Key Equations, Problems, and Suggested Reading.
1. The Nature of Physical Chemistry and the Kinetic Theory of Gases
1.1 The Nature of Physical Chemistry
1.2 Some Concepts from Classical Mechanics
1.3 Systems, States, and Equilibrium
1.4 Thermal Equilibrium
1.5 Pressure and Boyle's Law
Biography: Robert Boyle
1.6 Gay-Lussac's (Charles's) Law
1.7 The Ideal Gas Thermometer
1.8 The Equation of State for an Ideal Gas
1.9 The Kinetic-Molecular Theory of Ideal Gases
1.10 The Barometric Distribution Law
1.11 The Maxwell Distribution of Molecular Speeds and Translational Energies
1.12 Real Gases
1.13 Equations of State
1.14 The Virial Equation
Appendix: Some Definite and Indefinite Integrals Often Used in Physical Chemistry
2. The First Law of Thermodynamics
2.1 Origins of the First Law
2.2 States and State Functions
2.3 Equilibrium States and Reversibility
2.4 Energy, Heat, and Work
2.5 Thermochemistry
2.6 Ideal Gas Relationships
2.7 Real Gases
3. The Second and Third Laws of Thermodynamics
Biography: Rudolph Julius Emmanuel Clausius
3.1 The Carnot Cycle
3.2 Irreversible Processes
3.3 Molecular Interpretation of Entropy
3.4 The Calculation of Entropy Changes
3.5 The Third Law of Thermodynamics
3.6 Conditions for Equilibrium
3.7 The Gibbs Energy
3.8 Some Thermodynamic Relationships
3.9 The Gibbs-Helmholtz Equation
3.10 Thermodynamic Limitations to Energy Conversion
4. Chemical Equilibrium
Biography: Jacobus Henricus van't Hoff
4.1 Chemical Equilibrium Involving Ideal Gases
4.2 Equilibrium in Nonideal Gaseous Systems
4.3 Chemical Equilibrium in Solution
4.4 Heterogeneous Equilibrium
4.5 Tests for Chemical Equilibrium
4.6 Shifts of Equilibrium at Constant Temperature
4.7 Coupling of Reactions
4.8 Temperature Dependence of Equilibrium Constants
4.9 Pressure Dependence of Equilibrium Constants
5. Phases and Solutions
5.1 Phase Recognition
5.2 Vaporization and Vapor Pressure
5.3 Classification of Transitions in Single-Component Systems
5.4 Ideal Solutions: Raoult's and Henry's Laws
5.5 Partial Molar Quantities
5.6 The Chemical Potential
5.7 Thermodynamics of Solutions
5.8 The Colligative Properties
6. Phase Equilibria
6.1 Equilibrium Between Phases
6.2 One-Component Systems
6.3 Binary Systems Involving Vapor
6.4 Condensed Binary Systems
6.5 Thermal Analysis
6.6 More Complicated Binary Systems
6.7 Crystal Solubility: The Krafft Boundary and Krafft Eutectic
6.8 Ternary Systems
7. Solutions of Electrolytes
7.1 Faraday's Laws of Electrolysis
Biography: Michael Faraday
7.2 Molar Conductivity
7.3 Weak Electrolytes: The Arrhenius Theory
Biography: Svante August Arrhenius
7.4 Strong Electrolytes
7.5 Independent Migration of Ions
7.6 Transport Numbers
7.7 Ion Conductivities
7.8 Thermodynamics of Ions
7.9 Theories of Ions in Solution
7.10 Activity Coefficients
7.11 Ionic Equilibria
7.12 Ionization of Water
7.13 The Donnan Equilibrium
8. Electrochemical Cells
8.1 The Daniell Cell
8.2 Standard Electrode Potentials
8.3 Thermodynamics of Electrochemical Cells
8.4 Types of Electrochemical Cells
8.5 Applications of emf Measurements
8.6 Fuel Cells
8.7 Photogalvanic Cells
8.8 Batteries, Old and New
9. Chemical Kinetics I. The Basic Ideas
9.1 Rates of Consumption and Formation
9.2 Rate of Reaction
9.3 Empirical Rate Equations
9.4 Analysis of Kinetic Results
9.5 Techniques for Very Fast Reactions
9.6 Molecular Kinetics
9.7 The Arrhenius Equation
9.8 Potential-Energy Surfaces
9.9 The Preexponential Factor
Biography: Henry Eyring
9.10 Reactions in Solution
9.11 Reaction Dynamics
10. Chemical Kinetics II. Composite Mechanisms
10.1 Evidence for a Composite Mechanism
10.2 Types of Composite Reactions
10.3 Rate Equations for Composite Mechanisms
10.4 Rate Constants, Rate Coefficients, and Equilibrium Constants
10.5 Free-Radical Reactions
10.6 Photochemical Reactions
10.7 Radiation-Chemical Reactions
10.8 Explosions
10.9 Catalysis
10.10 Reactions in Solution: Some Special Features
10.11 Mechanisms of Polymerization in Macromolecules
10.12 Kinetics of Polymerization
10.13 Induction Periods, Oscillations, and Chaos
10.14 Electrochemical Dynamics
11. Quantum Mechanics and Atomic Structure
11.1 Electromagnetic Radiation and the Old Quantum Theory
11.2 Bohr's Atomic Theory
11.3 The Foundations of Quantum Mechanics
11.4 Schrödinger's Wave Mechanics
11.5 Quantum-Mechanical Postulates
11.6 Quantum Mechanics of Some Simple Systems
11.7 Quantum Mechanics of Hydrogenlike Atoms
11.8 Physical Significance of the Orbital Quantum Numbers
11.9 Angular Momentum and Magnetic Moment
11.10 The Rigid Linear Rotor
11.11 Spin Quantum Numbers
11.12 Many-Electron Atoms
11.13 Approximate Methods in Quantum Mechanics
12. The Chemical Bond
Biography: Gilbert Newton Lewis
12.1 The Hydrogen Molecular-Ion, H2+
12.2 The Hydrogen Molecule
12.3 Hückel Theory for More Complex Molecules
12.4 Valence-Bond Theory for More Complex Molecules
12.5 Symmetry in Chemistry
12.6 Symmetry of Molecular Orbitals
Appendix: Character Tables
13. Foundations of Chemical Spectroscopy
13.1 Emission and Absorption Spectra
13.2 Atomic Spectra
Biography: Gerhard Herzberg
13.3 Pure Rotational Spectra of Molecules
13.4 Vibrational-Rotational Spectra of Molecules
13.5 Raman Spectra
13.6 Electronic Spectra of Molecules
Appendix: Symmetry Species Corresponding to Infrared and Raman Spectra
14. Some Modern Applications of Spectroscopy
14.1 Laser Spectroscopy
14.2 Spectral Line Widths
14.3 Types of Lasers
14.4 Laser Techniques for Chemistry
14.5 Magnetic Spectroscopy
14.6 Nuclear Magnetic Spectroscopy
14.7 Electron Magnetic Resonance (EMR)
14.8 Mössbauer Spectroscopy
14.9 Photoelectron Spectroscopy
14.10 Photoacoustic Spectroscopy
14.11 Chiroptical Methods
14.12 Mass Spectrometry
15. Statistical Mechanics
15.1 Forms of Molecular Energy
Biography: Ludwig Boltzmann
15.2 Principles of Statistical Mechanics
15.3 The Partition Function
15.4 Thermodynamic Quantities from Partition Functions
15.5 The Partition Function for Some Special Cases
15.6 The Internal Energy, Enthalpy, and Gibbs Energy Functions
15.7 The Calculation of Equilibrium Constants
15.8 Transition-State Theory
15.9 The Approach to Equilibrium
15.10 The Canonical Ensemble
16. The Solid State
16.1 Crystal Forms and Crystal Lattices
16.2 X-Ray Crystallography
16.3 Experimental Methods
Biography: Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin
16.4 Theories of Solids
16.5 Statistical Thermodynamics of Crystals: Theories of Heat Capacities
16.6 Electrical Conductivity in Solids
16.7 Optical Properties of Solids
17. The Liquid State
17.1 Liquids Compared with Dense Gases
17.2 Liquids Compared with Solids
17.3 Intermolecular Forces
17.4 Theories and Models of Liquids
17.5 Water, the Incomparable Liquid
17.6 The Hydrophobic Effect
18. Surface Chemistry and Colloids
18.1 Adsorption
18.2 Adsorption Isotherms
18.3 Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics of Adsorption
18.4 Chemical Reactions on Surfaces
18.5 Surface Heterogeneity
18.6 The Structure of Solid Surfaces and of Adsorbed Layers
18.7 Surface Tension and Capillarity
18.8 Liquid Films on Surfaces
Biography: Agnes Pockels
18.9 Colloidal Systems
19. Transport Properties
19.1 Viscosity
19.2 Diffusion
19.3 Sedimentation
Appendix A Units, Quantities, and Symbols: The SI/IUPAC Recommendations
Appendix B Physical Constants
Appendix C Some Mathematical Relationships
Appendix D Standard Enthalpies, Entropies, and Gibbs Energies of Formation
Appendix E Character Tables for Some Important Symmetry Groups in Chemistry
Answers to Problems
Index

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CD-ROM  (ISBN-10: 0618257691 | ISBN-13: 9780618257690)

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Hybrid CD-ROM  (ISBN-10: 0618123431 | ISBN-13: 9780618123438)

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