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Composing to Communicate: A Student's Guide, 2016 MLA Update 1st Edition

Robert Saba

  • Published
  • 672 Pages
Starting At 50.00 See pricing and ISBN options

Overview

Meeting your students where they are, COMPOSING TO COMMUNICATE: A STUDENT’S GUIDE prepares and engages an increasingly varied first-year composition classroom, in which all students need to achieve the same course outcomes but are not all learning at the same skill level. The fundamental concept behind COMPOSING TO COMMUNICATE: A STUDENT’S GUIDE is that writing is a communication skill grounded in problem solving. The textbook uses accessible language and opportunities for practice to help students conceptualize writing tasks with key communication goals in mind and become more confident, efficient, and effective writers, in college and in their professional lives. Writing project chapters cover evaluations, arguments, narratives, profiles, literary analyses, and researched writing, and include chapters focused on community engagement and vital 21st century literacy skills. Every Part 2 chapter shows real student work in proposal and final draft, and includes an interview with the student writer. This edition has been updated to reflect guidelines from the 2016 MLA HANDBOOK, Eighth Edition.

Robert Saba, Florida International University

Robert Saba is the associate director of undergraduate writing programs at Florida International University in Miami. He has taught college writing for more than twenty-five years, specializing in first-year composition, advanced research, approaches to literature, courses about the history of the essay, and personal narratives. His publications include articles on writing, politics, and film, as well as short fiction and French-to-English translations.
  • The MLA documentation reflects significant changes in the new MLA HANDBOOK Eighth Edition, published in April 2016.
  • The relevance of different genres is presented in the context of communication goals and strategies that transfer to writing in the disciplines and professions.
  • Each Part 2 chapter provides an example, from start to finish, of how a student composed his or her essay. These eight writing project chapters are written and organized as "walk-throughs" that guide students through a process and timeline for completing a project effectively. They also feature student interviews, checklists, and advice for avoiding common problems.
  • Two unique writing project chapters are particularly geared to today's students. Chapter 9, "Public Writing and Community Engagement," encourages students to get involved by communicating with audiences beyond the classroom, providing guidance on how to become a public writer. Chapter 11, "Writing Beyond the Page: Shifting Genres and Using New Media," helps to equip students with 21st-century literacy skills, offering guidance on composing digital genres such as photo essays, podcasts, and videos.
  • "Communicating to Address Issues and Solve Problems" features in Part I chapters illustrate how public figures address social, political, and environmental problems. These features reflect a primary theme of the text -- that today's students need help clarifying their communication goals and thinking critically about how to address real issues that matter to them.
  • "From Reflection to Response" features throughout each chapter provide opportunities for writing practice and to think more deeply about a reading. Many of these features, together with "Working Together" activities, offer opportunities for students to collaborate.
Part I: WRITING TO COMMUNICATE AND SOLVE PROBLEMS.
1.The Relevance of Writing.
Writing as Communication.
Communication Situations and Goals.
The Basics of Problem Solving.
Brian Lawrence, Video Games as Art?
Becoming a Good Writer.
Leon Botstein, High School, an Institution Whose Time Has Passed: Let Teen-Agers Try Adulthood.
Joining the Conversation.
Academic Writing and Academic Style.
Evaluate Your Learning.
Additional Readings.
2Pac Shakur, “Unconditional Love” Lyrics.
Charles Bukowski, Fifth Grade Was a Little Better, from Ham on Rye.
2. Planning Essays as Communication.
Understanding Communication Goals.
Communication to Inform.
Communication to Solve Problems.
How to Plan.
Planning Different Kinds of Essays.
Ellen Goodman, When Big Father/Big Mother Spy on the Children.
LL Cool J, Impotent Demon.
Organization.
Naomi Wolf, The Porn Myth.
Jon Kerstetter, Triage.
Gerald W. Lynch and Roberta Blotner, Legalizing Drugs Would Not Lead to a Reduction in Crime.
Evaluate Your Learning.
Additional Readings.
Tibor R. Machan, Humans Ought to Use Nature to Serve Their Own Needs.
3. An Overview of the Writing Process.
A Process of Discovery.
Developing a Revision Process.
Planning and Invention.
The Rough Draft.
Writing the Opening.
Thesis Statements.
Revision and Rewriting.
Editing for a Professional Presentation.
Evaluate Your Learning.
Additional Readings.
William Zinsser, Simplicity, from On Writing Well.
Donald M. Murray, The Maker’s Eye: Revising Your Own Manuscripts.
Brent Staples, Black Men and Public Space.
Chuck Palahniuk, My Life As a Dog.
Part II: WRITING PROJECTS AND ESSAYS.
4. Narrative Essays.
Writing Narratives to Communicate and Solve Problems.
Basic Elements of Narratives.
A Student’s Essay Proposal.
Interview with the Student Writer.
Narrative Essays and Communication Goals.
James Baldwin, from Notes of a Native Son.
Coming Up with Ideas.
Diane Thiel, Crossing the Border, from The White Horse: A Colombian Journey.
Evaluating Ideas.
Writing a Proposal.
Writing a Rough Draft.
Your Essay Checklist.
Peer Review.
Student Essay: Final Draft.
Kierstin Koppel, An Experiment in Romantic Gamesmanship.
Interview with the Student Writer.
Evaluate Your Learning.
Additional Readings.
Karla Pereira, Roommates from Hell.
5. Profiles.
Portraits in Words.
Profiles That Communicate and Solve Problems.
Sarah Max, A Rude Experience Inspires a “Good” Brand.
A Student’s Essay Proposal.
Profiles and Communication Goals: Tracing a Theme.
E. B. White, Old Dameron.
Profiling a Person: The Human Factor.
Profiling a Place.
Family Man, Bizarro World.
R. L. Huffstutter, Some Thoughts about the Venice Beach of Fifty Years Ago and Writing “The Great American Novel”.
Profiling an Event.
Associated Press, Ultra Music Festival Brings Reveling Masses to Miami.
Writing a Proposal.
Writing a Rough Draft.
Special Considerations of the Essay.
Your Essay Checklist.
Peer Review.
Student Essay: Final Draft.
Kierstin Koppel, Humanizing Morticians.
Interview with the Student Writer.
Evaluate Your Learning.
Additional Readings.
Steven M. Fernandez, A Cuban Christmas.
Scott Russell Sanders, Under the Influence (MindTap edition only).
6. Evaluations and Reviews.
Communicating Meaningful Judgments.
A Student’s Essay Proposal.
Interview with the Student Writer.
Beyond Opinion and Taste.
Del F. Cowie, Review of good kid, m.A.A.d. city by Kendrick Lamar.
Clive Thompson, In Defense of Pinterest.
Grant McCracken, Why Reality TV Doesn’t Suck, and May Even Make Us Smarter.
Considering Subjects and Communication Goals.
Writing a Proposal.
Writing a Rough Draft.
Your Essay Checklist.
Peer Review.
Student Essay: Final Draft.
Thais Torquez, From the Street to Your Heart.
Interview with the Student Writer.
Evaluate Your Learning.
Additional Readings.
Zadie Smith, Generation Why (MindTap edition only).
Gerard Jones, Violent Media Is Good for Kids (MindTap edition only).
7. Arguments That Matter.
Arguments and Communication.
Arguments and Persuasion.
Arguments as a Genre.
Recognizing Enlightened Arguments.
A Student’s Essay Proposal.
Interview with the Student Writer.
Appeals to Ethos, Logos, and Pathos.
Fallacies.
Ana Veciana-Suarez, A Senior’s Photo Is Too Sexy for the School Yearbook.
Constructing Enlightened Arguments.
Jacob Bronowski, from The Ascent of Man.
Whittaker Chambers, from Witness.
David Harsanyi, Twinkie Fascists.
Patrick Buchanan, Did “The Great Society” Ruin Society?
Coming Up with Ideas.
Evaluating Ideas.
Writing a Proposal.
Writing a Rough Draft.
Your Essay Checklist.
Peer Review.
Student Essay: Final Draft.
Brian Lawrence, The Truth about Atheists.
Interview with the Student Writer.
Evaluate Your Learning.
Additional Readings.
Arlet Montes, The Debate about Modern Sexuality and Pornography.
Naomi Wolf, The Porn Myth (MindTap edition only).
Richard Rodriguez, Surnames Reflect the Changing Face of America (MindTap edition only).
8. Navigating Research Projects.
Research: Learning and Discovering to Solve Problems.
A Student’s Essay Proposal.
Interview with the Student Writer.
Developing and Implementing a Research Plan.
Conducting Research.
Writing a Proposal.
Writing a Rough Draft.
Martha Pitts, Happy-to-Be-Nappy Barbie.
Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa, Your So-Called Education.
Your Project Checklist.
Peer Review.
Student Essay: Final Draft.
Amanda McDole, Finding a Solution for Cyberbullying.
Interview with the Student Writer.
Evaluate Your Learning.
Additional Readings.
Cristina Alonso, The Show Must Go On.
Elizabeth Carls, A World of Possibilities: An Examination of the Human Impact (MindTap edition only).
9. Public Writing and Community Engagement
Writing to Communicate with Audiences beyond the Classroom.
Candy Chang, The Story.
Kinds of Public Writing.
Earth Crisis, Ecocide.
Carolina Souto, College Education Negatively Affected by Consumerism.
A Student’s Proposal.
Interview with the Student Writer.
Becoming a Public Writer.
Mark Shields, Protect Workers Making iPhones in Chinese Factories.
Choosing a Means for Going Public.
Writing a Proposal.
Writing a Rough Draft.
Public Writing and Community Engagement.
Your Project Checklist.
Peer Review.
Review and Assess Your Communication Goals.
Student Writing: Final Draft.
Michelle Saunders, Petition Letter.
Interview with the Student Writer.
Evaluate Your Learning.
Additional Readings.
Anonymous, Life after Rape (MindTap edition only).
Matt Honan, Why I Quit Instagram (MindTap edition only).
Alison Kopp, Quiet Kids Blog: It Sucks to Be the Quiet Kid in School (MindTap edition only).
10. Analyzing Stories.
Storytelling and the Literary Arts.
Literary Analysis.
A Student’s Essay Proposal.
An Interview with the Student Writer.
Elements of Stories: Plot, Character, and Theme.
Ernest Hemingway, A Very Short Story.
Considering Subjects and Communication Goals.
Using Sources.
Creative Invention Techniques.
Alternative Projects: Poems, Songs, and Movies as Stories.
William Carlos Williams, The Red Wheelbarrow.
Writing a Proposal.
Writing a Rough Draft.
Your Essay Checklist.
Peer Review.
Student Essay: Final Draft.
Fangyu Xu, The Romantic Ideal in James Joyce’s “Araby”.
An Interview with the Student Writer.
Evaluate Your Learning.
Additional Readings.
James Joyce, Araby.
Fredrick Waterman, The Sketchbook (MindTap edition only).
Ron Carlson, The Summer of Vintage Clothing (MindTap edition only).
11. Writing Beyond the Page: Shifting Genres and Using New Media.
Communications Yesterday and Today.
Understanding the Project.
Genre-Shift Project.
New Multimedia Project.
A Student’s Proposal and Design Plan.
An Interview with the Student Writer.
Communication and Visual Design.
Considering Genres, Forms, and Media.
Composing a Photo-Essay.
Benjamin Brink, Portland City Hall Campers Forced to Move.
Okeko Donaldson, Graffiti in the Wynwood Art District.
Creating a Photo-Essay for a New Multimedia Project.
Writing a Proposal and Design Plan.
Drafting Your Project.
Your Project Checklist.
Peer Review.
Student Project: Final Version.
Aaron Cervantes, How to Interact with the Police and Prevent Misconduct.
Interview with the Student Writer.
Evaluate Your Learning.
Additional Reading.
Carla Saulter, Bus Chick’s Manifesto (MindTap edition only).
Part III: CLEAR WRITING AND PROFESSIONAL PRESENTATIONS.
12. Developing an Effective Style.
Style Is the Writer.
Word Choice.
Good Sentences.
Rules and Usage.
A Few Good Rules.
Overcoming Ten Common Errors.
Evaluate Your Learning.
Additional Reading.
Rachel Toor, What Writing and Running Have in Common.
13. Writing in the Workplace: How College Writing Skills Transfer.
College and the Workplace.
Purpose and Audience.
Low- and High-Stakes Writing in the Workplace.
Addressing Issues and Solving Problems.
Marvin H. Swift, Clear Writing Means Clear Thinking Mean.
Common Workplace Genres, Forms, and Tasks.
Sheryl Jean, Goodbye Paper, Hello Social Résumé.
Effective Design Elements and Using New Media.
Writing and Your Career.
Evaluate Your Learning.
14. Using and Documenting Sources.
Introduction to This Guide.
Unpacking Secondary Sources.
Primary or “Field Research”: Methods and Procedures.
Documenting Sources in MLA Style.
A Brief Introduction to APA Style.
Evaluate Your Learning.
15. Text to Speech: Oral Presentations and Public Speaking (MindTap edition on-ly).
The Challenges of Public Speaking.
Planning Your Content.
Dr. Kenneth Claus, Defying “Fragilitis”.
Public Speaking to Solve Problems.
Classroom Presentations.
A Checklist for Planning a Presentation.
Suggestions for a Confident Delivery and Overcoming “Nerves”.
Evaluate Your Learning.
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